nypl:

Writing  can be a daunting task: the blank page staring back at you, the search for inspiration. Over the years, NYPL has spoken to dozens of notable authors who have faced this challenge and created something extraordinary. On National Day on Writing, we’ve collected the best bits of writing advice from our most beloved guests, including Zadie Smith, Toni Morrison, and Cheryl Strayed. 

nypl:

Writing  can be a daunting task: the blank page staring back at you, the search for inspiration. Over the years, NYPL has spoken to dozens of notable authors who have faced this challenge and created something extraordinary. On National Day on Writing, we’ve collected the best bits of writing advice from our most beloved guests, including Zadie Smith, Toni Morrison, and Cheryl Strayed. 

do-not-touch-my-food:

Honey Garlic Chicken
wolveswolves:


Nat Geo filmmakers Jim and Jamie Dutcher talk about their six years with the Sawtooth pack
It’s a paradoxical truth: They are the origin species of society’s beloved dog, yet humans have relentlessly persecuted and killed the gray wolf. Now on and off the endangered species list, the Canis lupus story is a tragic one. No two people know this better perhaps, than wildlife filmmakers Jim and Jamie Dutcher, who spent six years intermingling with a group of wolves in Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains to study the emotional and social dynamic of this misunderstood creature. The pair documented their experiences in a beautiful, highly informative book called The Hidden Life of Wolves.
In 1990, the Dutchers were given a special-use permit from the U.S. Forest Service to create an expansive space in which they would live with a pack of wolves. To be allowed intimate access by the animals, however, they had to create their own pack. After great searching, they were given a male, female, and four pups from rescue and research centers in Montana and Minnesota and the Sawtooth Pack was born. “Under the looming peaks of Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains…we built a vast enclosure, rich with aspen groves, streams, ponds, and meadows,” the Dutchers write in Hidden Life. “From the beginning, it was our hope that these wolves would act as ambassadors and educators, guiding us to a better understanding of their species.”
For the next six years, the Dutchers devoted their lives to observing the Sawtooth Pack. To gain the trust of the first residents, they bottle fed the pups, taking care of their needs around the clock. The four little ones bonded with the Dutchers, playing with the humans and even curling up on their laps. “We raised them from puppies so they didn’t fear us,” said Jim in a recent phone interview. “But we didn’t over-assert ourselves into the pack; we were just observers, and they went about their business and we went about ours. If you go out into the wild and you try to film wolves they’re so impacted by your presence that they change their natural behavior.” Added Jamie: “We never tried to dominate them or submit to them, and so in turn everything was very neutral; we were able to observe them without changing their behavior.
During their years with the pack, the Dutchers learned myriad myth-dispelling truths about wolf behavior. One particularly surprising—and touching—observation was how compassionate wolves are to their members. “A mountain lion killed one of our wolves and the pack’s behavior changed,” Jim explained. “They were mourning this loss of this member…They stopped playing completely—wolves play all the time, even into old age—for about six weeks.”
Since leaving the Sawtooth pack in 1996, the Dutchers have devoted their lives to educating people about the true nature of these elusive and wondrous animals through lectures, films, their nonprofit Living with Wolves (livingwithwolves.com), and now their book Hidden Life. Published by National Geographic, Hidden Life is comprised of more than 200 pages of stunning photography, personal stories, and stand-alone sections that, for example, describe wolf behavior and communication; depict the former and current range of the gray wolf; and introduce the Sawtooth wolves via a family tree. It’s an essential tome that allows people a rare glimpse into the complicated social fabric of the North American gray wolf.
Recently, the Dutchers spoke with me over the phone about the plight of the great gray wolf. Below is the full interview.
So I just got your book. It’s so beautiful. I am envious of the time you spent with the wolves. I know they’re not dogs, but they sure seem like dogs.
Jim: Well, that’s where dogs came from.
How was it when you had to say goodbye to the pack?
Jamie: Pretty painful. It was pretty hard on us.
You said in the book that you let the wolves come to you, as opposed to treating them like dogs and approaching them or trying to play with them.
Jamie: Yeah. Wolves shouldn’t be pets and you can’t really teach them anything, so everything was on their terms. We gave them names but they didn’t come to them, and you couldn’t ask them to do anything.
Read More

wolveswolves:

Nat Geo filmmakers Jim and Jamie Dutcher talk about their six years with the Sawtooth pack

It’s a paradoxical truth: They are the origin species of society’s beloved dog, yet humans have relentlessly persecuted and killed the gray wolf. Now on and off the endangered species list, the Canis lupus story is a tragic one. No two people know this better perhaps, than wildlife filmmakers Jim and Jamie Dutcher, who spent six years intermingling with a group of wolves in Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains to study the emotional and social dynamic of this misunderstood creature. The pair documented their experiences in a beautiful, highly informative book called The Hidden Life of Wolves.

In 1990, the Dutchers were given a special-use permit from the U.S. Forest Service to create an expansive space in which they would live with a pack of wolves. To be allowed intimate access by the animals, however, they had to create their own pack. After great searching, they were given a male, female, and four pups from rescue and research centers in Montana and Minnesota and the Sawtooth Pack was born. “Under the looming peaks of Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains…we built a vast enclosure, rich with aspen groves, streams, ponds, and meadows,” the Dutchers write in Hidden Life. “From the beginning, it was our hope that these wolves would act as ambassadors and educators, guiding us to a better understanding of their species.”

For the next six years, the Dutchers devoted their lives to observing the Sawtooth Pack. To gain the trust of the first residents, they bottle fed the pups, taking care of their needs around the clock. The four little ones bonded with the Dutchers, playing with the humans and even curling up on their laps. “We raised them from puppies so they didn’t fear us,” said Jim in a recent phone interview. “But we didn’t over-assert ourselves into the pack; we were just observers, and they went about their business and we went about ours. If you go out into the wild and you try to film wolves they’re so impacted by your presence that they change their natural behavior.” Added Jamie: “We never tried to dominate them or submit to them, and so in turn everything was very neutral; we were able to observe them without changing their behavior.

During their years with the pack, the Dutchers learned myriad myth-dispelling truths about wolf behavior. One particularly surprising—and touching—observation was how compassionate wolves are to their members. “A mountain lion killed one of our wolves and the pack’s behavior changed,” Jim explained. “They were mourning this loss of this member…They stopped playing completely—wolves play all the time, even into old age—for about six weeks.”

Since leaving the Sawtooth pack in 1996, the Dutchers have devoted their lives to educating people about the true nature of these elusive and wondrous animals through lectures, films, their nonprofit Living with Wolves (livingwithwolves.com), and now their book Hidden Life. Published by National Geographic, Hidden Life is comprised of more than 200 pages of stunning photography, personal stories, and stand-alone sections that, for example, describe wolf behavior and communication; depict the former and current range of the gray wolf; and introduce the Sawtooth wolves via a family tree. It’s an essential tome that allows people a rare glimpse into the complicated social fabric of the North American gray wolf.

Recently, the Dutchers spoke with me over the phone about the plight of the great gray wolf. Below is the full interview.

So I just got your book. It’s so beautiful. I am envious of the time you spent with the wolves. I know they’re not dogs, but they sure seem like dogs.

Jim: Well, that’s where dogs came from.

How was it when you had to say goodbye to the pack?

Jamie: Pretty painful. It was pretty hard on us.

You said in the book that you let the wolves come to you, as opposed to treating them like dogs and approaching them or trying to play with them.

Jamie: Yeah. Wolves shouldn’t be pets and you can’t really teach them anything, so everything was on their terms. We gave them names but they didn’t come to them, and you couldn’t ask them to do anything.

Read More

nutrifitblr:

 
garden-of-vegan:

Green Smoothie (1+ cups unsweetened soy milk, 1-2 handfuls of baby spinach, 2 frozen bananas, 2 tbsp hemp hearts) topped with hemp hearts, chia seeds, and pumpkin seeds.

garden-of-vegan:

Green Smoothie (1+ cups unsweetened soy milk, 1-2 handfuls of baby spinach, 2 frozen bananas, 2 tbsp hemp hearts) topped with hemp hearts, chia seeds, and pumpkin seeds.

nyrbclassics:


Ostensibly, The Outward Room is a novel of recovery. It charts the (now) familiar movement from sickness to health, from darkness to light. Harriet recovers because she unneurotically takes what she is given and asks for what she wants…Yet there is nothing formulaic or expected about this book: Brand’s world is too quiveringly alive, and his writing too idiosyncratically gorgeous, to ever be predictable…His descriptions of Depression-era New York City (the rooming houses, the elevated and subway trains, the all-night cafeterias, the sweatshops) have a stark Hopper-esque intensity and resonance. The first chapter of Part Two, which consists of a single four-page paragraph in which the homeless heroine spends the night riding the subway, is an incandescent dream of brilliant writing.
—Peter Cameron, afterword to The Outward Room by Millen Brand

As always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

nyrbclassics:

Ostensibly, The Outward Room is a novel of recovery. It charts the (now) familiar movement from sickness to health, from darkness to light. Harriet recovers because she unneurotically takes what she is given and asks for what she wants…Yet there is nothing formulaic or expected about this book: Brand’s world is too quiveringly alive, and his writing too idiosyncratically gorgeous, to ever be predictable…His descriptions of Depression-era New York City (the rooming houses, the elevated and subway trains, the all-night cafeterias, the sweatshops) have a stark Hopper-esque intensity and resonance. The first chapter of Part Two, which consists of a single four-page paragraph in which the homeless heroine spends the night riding the subway, is an incandescent dream of brilliant writing.

—Peter Cameron, afterword to The Outward Room by Millen Brand

As always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

jedavu:

Silhouettes Of Famous Architects Peeking From A Window Of Their Iconic Buildings

Architect and illustrator Federico Babina is back with more of his wonderful illustrations. 

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: J.R.R. Tolkien
John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, best known as J.R.R. Tolkein, was born on January 3, 1892 in Bloemfontein, South Africa. After the death of his father, Arthur, Tolkien, his mother, Malben and brother moved to the country hamlet of Sarehole, in Birmingham, England. When his mother passed away in 1904, Tolkein and his brother were taken in by a relative and raised at a boarding home. Eventually his guardian became a Catholic priest in Birmingham. 
He studied at Exeter College, where he earned a degree in Anglo-Saxon and Germanic languages and classic literature. After graduation, he became a lieutenant in Lancashire Fusiliers and served in World War I. During this time Tolkein never stopped writing. Eventually he was released from duty due to an illness. 
In 1920 Tolkein continued his linguistics studies while he joined the faculty of the University of Leeds. He then became a professor at Oxford University. At Oxford he began a writing club called The Inklings. Among The Inklings members were literary greats, such as C.S. Lewis and Owen Barfield. Oxford University proved to be a place of inspiration for Tolkien. It was also there, where he came up with the idea of “a hobbit.” While grading a paper, he unexpectedly jotted the phrase “a hobbit” down. 
The Hobbit was published in 1937. Upon its introduction to the world, it was categorized as a children’s book, something Tolkien never intended. He was also responsible for the original art work; he created more than 100 drawings. 
What followed next became his masterpiece: The Lord of the Rings series. The Fellowship of the Ring, part one, was released in 1954; The Two Towers and The Return of the King was released the next year in 1955. His masterpiece introduced readers to a new world composed of new lands, elves, goblins, mystical creatures and new languages. The trilogy is a sophisticated piece of literature. Its plot structure is intricate, while creating a labyrinth of characters interconnected to the greater scheme of Tolkien’s fictional world. 
The Lord of the Rings became a global best seller. Tolkien fans are committed and born every day. There are societies devoted to learning his fictional languages and worlds. There is no doubt that Tolkien’s descriptive prose and knowledge of European mythology helped him achieved its classic status. His writing style was straightforward and unpretentious, a perfect recipe to follow when introducing a mysterious, complex world. C.S. Lewis explained it effortlessly in The Times, a British newspaper:

"The truth is that in this book a number of good things, never before united, have come together: a fund of humour, an understanding of children, and a happy fusion of the scholar’s with the poet’s grasp of mythology… The professor has the air of inventing nothing. He has studied trolls and dragons at first hand and describes them with that fidelity that is worth oceans of glib ‘originality.’"

Towards the end of his career in 1959, he published an essay, a poetry collection titled, Tree and Leaf, and Smith of Wootton Major, a fantasy story. J.R.R. Tolkien died on September 2, 1973. He left an unwavering legacy behind. His major works have been transformed into blockbuster films with devoted and curious fans. He is more relevant and successful today than during his lifetime. 
NOTABLE WORKS
The Hobbit (1937)
The Lord of the Rings trilogy
The Fellowship of the Ring (#1) (1954)
The Two Towers (#2) (1955)
The Return of the King (1955)
The Silmarillion (1977)
Read excerpts by J.R.R. Tolkien here! Get his books here!

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: J.R.R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, best known as J.R.R. Tolkein, was born on January 3, 1892 in Bloemfontein, South Africa. After the death of his father, Arthur, Tolkien, his mother, Malben and brother moved to the country hamlet of Sarehole, in Birmingham, England. When his mother passed away in 1904, Tolkein and his brother were taken in by a relative and raised at a boarding home. Eventually his guardian became a Catholic priest in Birmingham. 

He studied at Exeter College, where he earned a degree in Anglo-Saxon and Germanic languages and classic literature. After graduation, he became a lieutenant in Lancashire Fusiliers and served in World War I. During this time Tolkein never stopped writing. Eventually he was released from duty due to an illness. 

In 1920 Tolkein continued his linguistics studies while he joined the faculty of the University of Leeds. He then became a professor at Oxford University. At Oxford he began a writing club called The Inklings. Among The Inklings members were literary greats, such as C.S. Lewis and Owen Barfield. Oxford University proved to be a place of inspiration for Tolkien. It was also there, where he came up with the idea of “a hobbit.” While grading a paper, he unexpectedly jotted the phrase “a hobbit” down. 

The Hobbit was published in 1937. Upon its introduction to the world, it was categorized as a children’s book, something Tolkien never intended. He was also responsible for the original art work; he created more than 100 drawings. 

What followed next became his masterpiece: The Lord of the Rings series. The Fellowship of the Ring, part one, was released in 1954; The Two Towers and The Return of the King was released the next year in 1955. His masterpiece introduced readers to a new world composed of new lands, elves, goblins, mystical creatures and new languages. The trilogy is a sophisticated piece of literature. Its plot structure is intricate, while creating a labyrinth of characters interconnected to the greater scheme of Tolkien’s fictional world. 

The Lord of the Rings became a global best seller. Tolkien fans are committed and born every day. There are societies devoted to learning his fictional languages and worlds. There is no doubt that Tolkien’s descriptive prose and knowledge of European mythology helped him achieved its classic status. His writing style was straightforward and unpretentious, a perfect recipe to follow when introducing a mysterious, complex world. C.S. Lewis explained it effortlessly in The Times, a British newspaper:

"The truth is that in this book a number of good things, never before united, have come together: a fund of humour, an understanding of children, and a happy fusion of the scholar’s with the poet’s grasp of mythology… The professor has the air of inventing nothing. He has studied trolls and dragons at first hand and describes them with that fidelity that is worth oceans of glib ‘originality.’"

Towards the end of his career in 1959, he published an essay, a poetry collection titled, Tree and Leaf, and Smith of Wootton Major, a fantasy story. J.R.R. Tolkien died on September 2, 1973. He left an unwavering legacy behind. His major works have been transformed into blockbuster films with devoted and curious fans. He is more relevant and successful today than during his lifetime. 

NOTABLE WORKS

The Hobbit (1937)

The Lord of the Rings trilogy

The Fellowship of the Ring (#1) (1954)

The Two Towers (#2) (1955)

The Return of the King (1955)

The Silmarillion (1977)

Read excerpts by J.R.R. Tolkien here! Get his books here!

ealuxe:

Who is hungry? | Source | Facebook | Pinterest

ealuxe:

Who is hungry? | Source | Facebook | Pinterest

jerryjamesstone:

Roasted Red Beet Hummus http://buff.ly/1scGmi5

One of my favorite recipes! While I know some would argue that anything other than chickpeas is NOT hummus, I like to explore the addition of other ingredients. Red beets are the perfect one! This hummus is tangy, earthy, and big on flavor. Perfect for pita chips or a sandwich.