prettybooks:

2014 Book ChallengeIt’s time to pick a reading goal for 2014! I chose to read 50 books in 2013, but for my sixth 50 Book Challenge, I’m challenging myself to read 100 books this year. I read 100 books in a year only once before, in 2011.The Rules1. Choose an amount of books that you want to read in 2014 (e.g. 25, 50, 75, 100)2. Read, read, read!The BooksThere isn’t a rule about what kind books these have to be so read anything you want (novels, children’s books, re-reads, short stories, non-fiction, graphic novels, school books…). You can make a list of the books you want to read before you start or you can choose books as you go along. The ChallengeTo keep track of how much you’re reading, you can use the Goodreads Reading Challenge (they will launch a new one in early January), create a list (on Tumblr, LibraryThing, WordPress, Blogger, BookLikes, your computer) or a playlist on your YouTube channel, write book reviews or create video reviews, post every book cover, post photos of your books - it’s up to you. I like to create a 50 Book Challenge page, tag my book reviews and use Goodreads. Use the 50 book challenge tag so that others can keep up with your progress. You can use the above banner on your page or create your own! However, although this is a quantifiable challenge, the most important thing is that you’re reading and that you’re having fun doing it :)

prettybooks:

2014 Book Challenge
It’s time to pick a reading goal for 2014! I chose to read 50 books in 2013, but for my sixth 50 Book Challenge, I’m challenging myself to read 100 books this year. I read 100 books in a year only once before, in 2011.

The Rules
1. Choose an amount of books that you want to read in 2014 (e.g. 25, 50, 75, 100)
2. Read, read, read!

The Books
There isn’t a rule about what kind books these have to be so read anything you want (novels, children’s books, re-reads, short stories, non-fiction, graphic novels, school books…). You can make a list of the books you want to read before you start or you can choose books as you go along.

The Challenge
To keep track of how much you’re reading, you can use the Goodreads Reading Challenge (they will launch a new one in early January), create a list (on Tumblr, LibraryThing, WordPress, Blogger, BookLikes, your computer) or a playlist on your YouTube channel, write book reviews or create video reviews, post every book cover, post photos of your books - it’s up to you. I like to create a 50 Book Challenge page, tag my book reviews and use Goodreads. Use the 50 book challenge tag so that others can keep up with your progress. You can use the above banner on your page or create your own!

However, although this is a quantifiable challenge, the most important thing is that you’re reading and that you’re having fun doing it :)

slowartday:

Zachas (Ernest Zacharevic)

gastrogirl:

basil roasted eggplant with heirloom tomatoes and a balsamic drizzle.
delta-breezes:

Blackberry Brown Butter Cake | Adventures in Cooking

labelleabeille:

Crustaceapods — paintings by Robert Steven Connett


reading is living. by Ilmari Nen
luzfosca:

R. Spira
To the diving board, 1935
via

luzfosca:

R. Spira

To the diving board, 1935

via

mooglyblog:

Hook for Your Books with 10 Free Crochet Bookmark Patterns!

On Aug. 9, 1945, Satoru Miyashiro drastically changed the course of history.
Miyashiro was a steel mill worker in the city of Kokura, now present-day Kitakyushu, Japan, which sits on the country’s southwest coast. On that morning, American B-29 bombers were flying toward Kokura carrying a second atomic bomb — the first had been deployed over Hiroshima a few days earlier, killing an estimated 135,000 people and destroying 6 square miles of the city.
Miyashiro had heard from co-workers about the “new bomb” that destroyed Hiroshima. They had traveled through there on their way back to the steel mill. He believed his city would be next because there were arms facilities nearby. When air raid sirens went off on Aug. 9, his boss ordered him to turn on the incinerator.
The American bombers didn’t see this coming.
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On Aug. 9, 1945, Satoru Miyashiro drastically changed the course of history.

Miyashiro was a steel mill worker in the city of Kokura, now present-day Kitakyushu, Japan, which sits on the country’s southwest coast. On that morning, American B-29 bombers were flying toward Kokura carrying a second atomic bomb — the first had been deployed over Hiroshima a few days earlier, killing an estimated 135,000 people and destroying 6 square miles of the city.

Miyashiro had heard from co-workers about the “new bomb” that destroyed Hiroshima. They had traveled through there on their way back to the steel mill. He believed his city would be next because there were arms facilities nearby. When air raid sirens went off on Aug. 9, his boss ordered him to turn on the incinerator.

The American bombers didn’t see this coming.

Follow micdotcom

delta-breezes:

Berries & Cream Cake by carey nershi on Flickr.
gastrogirl:

fried zucchini blossoms stuffed with basil ricotta.